Veliac Three Electric Trike Uses a New Lean System

| April 4, 2012 |

The London-based electric bicycle manufacturer 50Cycles has launched its Veliac Three electric tricycle, which uses a new mechanism to make it easier for the rider to negotiate curves and turns.

This new design means that tricycles no longer have to sacrifice “tight handling” just because they are electricity-powered. Conventional tricycles are difficult to handle on roads with lots of curves.

The Veliac Three overcomes this drawback by using a torsion bar that runs lengthwise. This allows the foreframe, seat, handlebar, forks and front wheel to lean independently of the rear-wheel box. In turn, this design allows the rider to lean into turns even on this tricycle, just as they would on a bicycle.

The torsion bar is controlled by a lever mounted on the handlebar and once the lever is locked, the torsion bar becomes completely rigid, so the frame is kept stiff.

The tilting axis apart, the Veliac Three is like any other electric tricycle. It is powered by a 250 watt brushless motor that runs on a 36 Volt Lithium ion battery.

The Veliac is eco-friendly in that it also offers a pedal-assist system so that the rider can avoid using the electric power. Dual hand-brakes, a brake light, lights to indicate turns and an electronic horn are all standard accessories on this tricycle.

Three power modes are available. The mode selected determines the power delivered by the motor (the balance power comes from the rider pedalling away). The low power mode uses only 50% of the electrical power; consequently, maximum speed is 10 Kmph.

The medium mode allows a speed of 15 Kmph, but consumes 70% power, while the high mode draws 100% power from the battery but propels you along at 25Kmph.

This tricycle can carry up to 140 Kg, including cargo placed in the basket fitted at the rear. At around $2,380 (£1,490), it is quite expensive, this price includes delivery in the UK.




Comments