1TB SSD, OCZ Octane Series

| October 25, 2011 | Comments

Conventional hard disc drives are electromechanical storage devices, while solid state drives (SSDs) store data electronically. The latter are more expensive, but also faster, less noisy, and less susceptible to damage through physical shocks. To put things in perspective, the MacBook Air uses an SSD, which is why it boots faster and files are saved and opened faster compared to computers that have HDDs.

Having acquired Indilinx earlier in the year, OCZ Technology has now announced the launch of its Octane SATA 2.0 and SATA 3.0 SSD. The products are likely to be available starting November 1.

Although their prices are not yet known, it is expected that pricing will be in the range of $1.10-$1.30 per GB. Both SSDs are based on the Indilinx Everest controller, with a 512 MB DRAM cache.

While the SATA 3.0 will offer sequential reading speeds of 560MB/sec and writing speeds of 400MB/sec, the SATA 2.0 version will offer sequential reading and writing speeds of 275 MB/sec and 265 MB/sec. Both are believed to offer 128GB-1TB storage capacity. They are reportedly the world’s first SSD in 2.5” format with 1TB storage capacity.

Indilinx’s proprietary NDurance technology is believed to increase lifespan of the NAND flash memory, besides improving reliability and performance and guarding against degradation in performance when it is heavily utilised. It also offers automatic encryption for improved data security.

Another advantage that the OCZ SSDs offer is their ability to perform across varied workloads, meaning fixed file sizes and compressible as well as incompressible data. This is believed to be in contrast to other SSDs that are optimized for a narrower band of applications.





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