Enigma Machine Auction in London

| September 29, 2011 | Comments

Right oh chaps, keep your stiff upper lip intact and no quivering with nostalgia here please as our boys would be proud of this bit of news that’s for sure! Who said gadgets had to be new? The use of clever, innovative and brilliant ideas has been around for centuries and goes back to times of the prehistoric age and those brave people who lived through the two World Wars.

An old fashioned piece of technology called an Enigma Machine is soon to be on auction, presented at the infamous Christie’s on the 29th September and is sure to cause many in attendance to enter into a frenzy of bidding.

This Enigma machine is a triple rotor variety and was in use by the military forces in Germany, employed to cleverly deploy messages with needed encryption to foil the enemy.

It used a brilliant coding system which was claimed to be un-crackable. However, in a famous breakthrough, the amazing Bletchley Park team actually beat the system by decoding it.

A few of the Enigma machines still survive post Second World War and it’s not often one pops onto the market. An important pre-release of what modern computers are today, the clever gadget was originally of Dutch design, taken on board by the German’s from 1929. It sent brilliantly encoded messages and signals using morse code systems to another similar device located globally.

Definitely not a one-trick pony either, as the Enigma machine could employ up to a massive 158 million, million possible combinations which led the Germans to think it was invincible. The Bletchley team helped to bring the Second World War to a swifter close, decoding around 6000 messages daily at their busiest.

For those who want to grab a bit of history, grasp the wallets firmly as old money won’t work here. The last one auctioned in November 2010 brought around £67,000, so this Enigma could bring significantly more!

Update: The Enigma machine sold for a record $208,137 (£133,250) on Thursday September 29 at Christie’s Auction House, London.





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Category: Electronic Gadgets