Liquid flow battery, Refuel Electric Vehicles in Minutes not Hours

| August 14, 2011 | Comments

As brilliant as the theory behind them, undoubtedly electric cars do have some marvellous benefits and if making the world a distinctly greener place is close to your heart, electric is a fantastic, albeit pricey solution.

However, the need to recharge your nifty little electric number and bung it into a plug from the mains pretty often when compared to fuel alternatives, is tedious to say the least. Coupled with the fact that charging an electric car takes forever, so if you’re in a rush you’ve had it and to buy one is a far cry from cheap.

These are probably the most significant reasons that we don’t witness many silently gliding electric cars on today’s highway.

The whiz kids at 24M Technologies and MIT are though working on a solution. Designed to provide a non expensive, ‘partly firm’ flow battery, nicknamed ‘Cambridge Crude’, this wowza idea would enable a car running by electric the facility to be charged up in just a few moments at the local petrol station, thus reclaiming precious time.

The design utilises a partnering of two unique holding sections, the first that contains positive anodes, the other holding negative anodes, both of which are held in a dark liquid. Basically as both the negative and positive bits of the anodes interact they produce electricity by swapping ions in another container.

Once all the electrons have been expended, normal recharging can take place or old liquid can be replaced with a previously charged solution which seems just as easy as carrying a spare mobile ‘phone battery.

This solution is promised to be pretty cheap and also gives much more charging room than a normal lithium based battery, meaning ‘liquid leccy’, although in its toddler stage at the moment, could propel a car much further distances than the electric car of today.





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